Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker (Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Books)

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker (Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Books)

Patricia Hruby Powell

Language: English

Pages: 104

ISBN: 1452103143

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Coretta Scott King Book Award, Illustrator, Honor
Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award, Honor
Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, Nonfiction Honor
Parent's Choice Award
Wall Street Journal's 10 Best Children's Books of the Year List
Bologna Ragazzi Nonfiction Honor 2014

In exuberant verse and stirring pictures, Patricia Hruby Powell and Christian Robinson create an extraordinary portrait for young people of the passionate performer and civil rights advocate Josephine Baker, the woman who worked her way from the slums of St. Louis to the grandest stages in the world. Meticulously researched by both author and artist, Josephine's powerful story of struggle and triumph is an inspiration and a spectacle, just like the legend herself.

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Steppers scolded her, consoled her, then took her back into the fold. She begged the director, Mr. Bob Russell, could she PLEASE DANCE on stage. She knew every dance. Every song. Mr. Russell said her skin was too light to fit in with the other girls. “To the whites looked chocolate, to the blacks, like a pinky.” But Mr. Russell, tired of her begging, let her join the chorus line. HOORAH. Josephine danced on stage after stage, sang to the crowds, but

Steppers scolded her, consoled her, then took her back into the fold. She begged the director, Mr. Bob Russell, could she PLEASE DANCE on stage. She knew every dance. Every song. Mr. Russell said her skin was too light to fit in with the other girls. “To the whites looked chocolate, to the blacks, like a pinky.” But Mr. Russell, tired of her begging, let her join the chorus line. HOORAH. Josephine danced on stage after stage, sang to the crowds, but

reported her DEAD. But she got well. Well enough to comfort the wounded, bounce along dirt roads, get lost in sandstorms, sleep on the ground like a soldier with the sand fleas— all to perform for the U.S. troops. BLACK soldiers must sit down FRONT, she said, together with the white soldiers in her audience. Never had she been happier. Josephine became A HERO. She helped win the war for France, the U.S., and their allies. And she was awarded France’s highest honor, the Légion d’Honneur.

popular anymore— some tours weren’t such a great success— still she loved to perform. And she loved to arrive home with hugs as wide as wings and gifts for the children. She sold her gowns to pay her bills— NOT ENOUGH MONEY. So she sold her art and her jewels. STILL not enough. Her château was sold from beneath her. She CLUNG. They dragged. She KICKED and BIT. But she ended up in the street in the rain, EVICTED, her children—homeless, her health—failing, her

Josephine. Translated by Mariana Fitzpatrick. New York: Paragon House, 1988. pp. 16, 24, 28–29, 38, 47, 48, 50, 51–52, 87, 116, 125, 162, 205. Baker, Josephine, and Marcel Sauvage. Les Mémoires de Joséphine Baker. Paris: KRA, 1927. pp. 57, 149. Baker, Josephine, and Marcel Sauvage. Les Mémoires de Joséphine Baker. Paris: Correa, 1949. p. 270. Haney, Lynn. Naked at the Feast: A Biography of Josephine Baker. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1981. pp. 15, 28.

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